Occupational Safety & Health

The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 created the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) within the Department of Labor to encourage employers and employees to reduce workplace hazards and to implement safety and health programs. OSHA sets the workplace health and safety standards and conducts investigations to ensure employers are complying with the standards. In addition to specific requirements, employers must generally adopt methods, practices or procedures to protect workers on the job. OSHA also requires employers to keep a record of all workplace injuries and report any serious injuries or deaths to OSHA. Employers are required to tell employees if their work involves hazardous materials.

OSHA is authorized under The Occupational Safety and Health Act to conduct workplace inspections, which are usually conducted without advance notice. What many employers and business owners do not know, is that the OSHA inspector is only supposed to investigate the area of your business in which the accident or incident occurred. Frequently, however, the OSHA inspector will investigate as much of your business as you let him investigate. If he finds a violation in a place is not supposed to investigate, he can still issue a citation.

We have the experience to address all of the legal issues pertaining to employment and environmental OSHA matters. In addition to our litigation work, we advise clients in the development and implementation of programs and practices that reduce of the possibility of OSHA citation.

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